Home Research & Advocacy Northern Food Insecurity

Don’t miss!

Hunger Facts

icon

45%

of those using food banks are from single-person households.

Northern Food Insecurity

Canadians living in northern and remote communities face highly elevated, and in some cases extreme, levels of food insecurity.

There are significant challenges for food banks in the North, not the least of which is access to logistics and transportation to bring in a steady supply of food. The lack of consistent community food supports makes the need for policy change all the more critical and urgent.

More needs to be done to address the high levels of food insecurity in Northern Canada, which is why Food Banks Canada continues to recommend more focus and attention by governments on this issue. Further, each policy recommendation made in this report, if implemented nationally, would support a reduced need for the services of food banks in the North.


What Will it Take to Make Real Progress on Northern Food Security?

What Will it Take to Make Real Progress on Northern Food Security?

Northern Canadians face highly elevated levels of food insecurity. Particularly among First Nations, Métis and Inuit populations, a combination of low income, the high cost of store-bought foods, and decreased access to traditional foods has contributed to levels of food insecurity that are nothing short of a public health emergency.

Is Nutrition North Canada on Shifting Ground?

Is Nutrition North Canada on Shifting Ground?

We make the case that Nutrition North Canada is a simple subsidy for northern retailers that has been built on a flawed, overly-ambitious policy rationale.

Don’t miss!

Hunger Facts

apple

38%

of food distributed by Canadian food banks is fresh (eg. milk, eggs, fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables, bread)