Home Read Our Blog May 2017 Community Gardening- A Way to Raise Food and Much, Much More

Community Gardening- A Way to Raise Food and Much, Much More

Community Gardening- A Way to Raise Food and Much, Much More

Some people were raised with gardening in their blood, others have no experience with it at all. Either way, it is a worthwhile endeavor. This activity is catching on with many Food Banks in a big way. Why? Because it’s a way to not only grow a precious and much needed asset- food, but to also benefit from many spin-off effects.

The most successful community gardens are started with input from the community itself. Where should it be? Who will contribute? What supplies will be needed? How will it be done? What’s the end goal? The very act of coming together to discuss these questions brings us closer together.

Putting your hands in the dirt with your neighbours and friends is a great way to socialize, all while getting some healthy fresh air and physical exercise. Going to bed at night and being able to see the tangible results of good, hard work is rewarding in a way that we don’t often see.

Children can also learn valuable life skills working alongside adults and seniors in the community garden. With these skills comes confidence and ability. Feeling like they can tackle a long-term project from beginning to end is a gift that teaches delayed gratification and planning. All so important to success in life.

Finally, seasonal, local, fresh food is of course the greatest payoff of this community activity. Having a harvest to celebrate together. What could be better than that?

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Hunger Facts

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38%

of food distributed by Canadian food banks is fresh (eg. milk, eggs, fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables, bread)